river coexistence…

Good Morning Barbara & all you Nature Cuddlers,

sediment build up after storms…

My recent river visits include long stare pauses at the widening sediment sections in the river. The rain filled storms have caused impressive changes in the lower river reach. The area between Laurel St. bridge and the river mouth is now really shallow, the passage by the Riverside Ave. bridge has narrowed drastically.
This water condition is not ideal for the fish hunting OSPREYS, because they require a certain river depth and width to grab the fish. The other day I watched an OSPREY for a long time as it kept circling over the lower river. It never attempted one of its awesome fish plunges. So I wondered if my river compadres was addressing the OSPREY’S hunting dilemma when he said: ‘The sediment build up is chocking the river’.

placing the bucking beam…

It’s oddly fascinating that the construction of the Trestle path is roping me in. The other day I couldn’t take my eyes off the 3 workers, who tried to place a huge beam underneath the bridge. One man was standing above the water on a wood plank. The other 2 men were holding the free floating beam over the path railing with 2 heavy lines. Every time the man on the structure beam tried to guide the wood beam to its location, the beam would swerve and buck the 2 men off their spot. I couldn’t take the suspense and left…

f. MALLARD & SPOTTED SANDPIPER peaceful coexisting…

Lately I have been intrigued how different species share peacefully close vicinity. They rest, feed and are content to exist next to each other. They acknowledge their feathered neighbor, weave their way around them in their pursuit of life. When their paths cross, both species will stop, look at the other one while figuring out how to proceed. The bigger species is reluctant to move around the little, agile species, so most of the time the smaller species zoom by the bulky ones. It seems that it’s not easy to get a husky body moving plus it takes more energy. Animals are very good energy savers, so they like to avoid extra work.

little Shorebird w/the big gulls…

The busy SANDERLINGS have left the river shores and I miss seeing their small, white bodies dashing along the water line. The SPOTTED SANDPIPER’s plumage is changing into its weeding outfit and soon the chest spots will become pronounced. Of course I hope they will nest along the river.
The other day I saw a LOON foraging by the Trestle and it looked a little worn out with its feathers askew. The storms are hard on the migratory birds, so our river offers them a welcome refuge.

LOON taking a river break…

I have been getting ready for an other restoration project with 2 young interns from the Watershed Stewardship Program. They are required to host an event for their Program and I am thrilled to co-work with 2 young women, who are starting their careers in watershed protection. So come, meet them and cheer their efforts on Sat. March 9th from 9am-1pm.
Click on Watershed Stewardship Program for more details.
Sending you river chirps & wish you the best,
jane

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